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Oceans of support for rāhui rollover

A huge thank you to the 1,039 people who made a submission through the Fish Forever website in support of the rāhui rollover! Our hope is Fisheries NZ (MPI) will extend the rāhui for a further two years.

Thank also to Ngati Kuta and Patukeha hapu for intitating this environmental protection of Maunganui Bay (Deep Water Cove) back in 2010 and applying for rollovers every two years since then!

Read the Bay Chronicle's article here

For more information on the Rahui visit www.rahui.org.nz

Wrecked Reefs by John Booth - Russell Review Article

Just where does the buck stop for shallow-reef kelp loss in the Bay of Islands? It has crept up on us. The process has been slow and steady – measured in decades. It’s only when we’re confronted with then-and-now photographs that the scale of injury becomes apparent.

Most of the shallow-reef kelp (to around 6-metres depth) in the main basin of the Bay of Islands has gone. The full implications of this loss of biological diversity are poorly understood, but are potentially enormous. ‘But why worry? There’s plenty more kelp deeper down.

Bay of Islands Recreational Fishing Report - John Booth

Recreational fishing in the Bay of Islands: intense pressure contributes to stress on fishstocks and to local ecological degradation. By John Booth, 2016

Kina and their effect on algal communities in the Bay of Islands

Rocky shores around New Zealand have areas in water depths of between about three to eleven metres where there is little (and sometimes no) kelp. In a number of places these areas only have algal felts or low turfs and many kina (sea urchins). Initially this was thought to be the natural state. Researchers here and overseas have since found such barrens are the result of intensive browsing by sea urchins that prevents kelp regrowth. (April 2016)

Maunganui Bay rahui rolled for a further two years!

A huge thank you to Ngati Kuta and Patukeha hapu for intitiating and extending this rahui. The area has now been protected since 2010.

The Ministry of Primary Industries have confirmed the temporary closure of Maunganui Bay Rahui until the 29th October 2018  Closed under section 186A of the Fisheries Act 1996 to fishing for all species except kina.

For full information visit: www.rahui.org.nz

Help get Marine Reserves for the Otago Coast

Submissions have now closed. Thank you to all those who participated.

Gigantic kelp forests, deep sea canyons, albatross, sea lions, amazing bryozoan beds, endangered dolphins and yellow-eyed penguins. The South Island’s South-east coast has it all … except marine reserves.

Obituary: David Clarkson

Sad news, David Clarkson, the man who established Bay of Islands Maritime Park Inc, way back in 2007 (the umbrella organization of Fish Forever and Living Waters) passed away at his home in Kerikeri last week.

Life Beneath the Waves

LIFE BENEATH THE WAVES: WAEWAETOREA, A VERY SPECIAL PLACE, presented by Vince Kerr

Free public talk on Thurs 21 Jan 2016 | 7pm social/bar | 7.30pm talk | Theatre Terrace & Bar, Turner Ctr, Kerikeri | Koha

Waewaetorea and its surrounds in the Eastern Bay of Islands is something of an ecological gem. There is an astonishingly diverse array of habitats that supports an incredible range of marine species and communities. Many would argue that this area has international standing for its biodiversity.

Profile: Wade Doak

Wade is an experienced diver, prolific author and researcher, a marine reserve advocate and an all-round enthusiast for ocean systems and the biota that inhabit them. He has always supported Fish Forever’s work and so it’s a pleasure to be able to let him speak for himself here.

It also allowed him to give a timely tribute to Bill Ballantine, the father of marine conservation in New Zealand, who died earlier this month. (Nov 2015)

Voices of Land and Sea

roger grace red moki thumbVoice of Land and Sea is a new talk series exploring the Bay of Islands’ natural world, hosted by Fish Forever and Living Water.

This monthly talk series will reveal fascinating aspects of the Bay of Islands ecological landscape, celebrate its uniqueness and challenge us to be guardians of it. We hope to encourage people to connect with their environment on a deeper level: to gain more pleasure from their own backyard and raise awareness about the importance of preserving it.

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